If you have recently built or bought a new log home, then you know the joy and excitement of finally stepping back in time to the rustic feel and the slower-paced lifestyle that a log home offers. You may have even said, "this is life"!

However, if you have had your home for a couple of years, you may have noticed the stain is not looking as good as it once did. You may notice on the sunny side of the home premature fading and, or blisters and peeling. There are various companies that provide Log Home Restoration service.

refinished logs and log home chinking

You may see black spots and patches showing through the stain that seems to be growing larger. I am often asked if this stain performance is the normal progression and is to be expected. My answer is "yes under the circumstances." However, the answer should be no if the log home is properly prepared to receive the stain. If any of this sounds familiar, there is a good possibility more is going on with your logs than you might imagine.

When logs are first milled they are left with what is known in the industry as "Mill Glaze" on the surface of the logs.

Caused from the fast-spinning hot blades in the sawmill, it draws the sap to the surface of the wood and dries forming a thin glaze or film on the logs. Also, when first milled, the logs generally have a high level of moisture either from being freshly cut logs or being left outside in the rain or both.

When a log home is built using these "green" and "mill glazed" logs, you can expect to have finish problems sooner rather than later. Once the logs are erected and the roof dried in, most of the time the builder will have it stained to keep any more dirt from accumulating from the ongoing construction. Good for the builder, bad for the homeowner. When this is done, several things are occurring.